Shop

Híkuri (Peyote)

$18.00

‘Híkuri (Peyote)’ is Mexican Infrarealist José Vicente Anaya’s cult-classic poem.

Influenced by his participation in a series of peyote ceremonies in his native Chihuahua, Anaya charts a transformative journey inwards, towards a psychedelic convergence of inside/outside, male/female, past/present, self/other. Incorporating Rarámuri language and traversing territory associated with ecopoetics, ethnopoetics, modernism, and infrarealism, Híkuri (Peyote) presents a utopian alternative to EuroAmerican colonial modernity—a reclamation of autonomy and poetic nomadism.

An excerpt of this translation appears at:

https://www.asymptotejournal.com/poetry/jose-vicente-anaya-hikuri-peyote/

Category:

José Vincente Anaya (tr. Joshua Pollock)

José Vicente Anaya (Villa Coronado, Chihuahua, 1947) is a Mexican poet, essayist, translator, editor, and journalist. He was founder and co-director of the poetry journal Alforja from 1997 to 2008. In 1980 he won the Plural prize in poetry. In 1981 he was awarded the INBA-FONAPAS poetry grant. In 1989 he received the Tomás Valles Literature Prize. In 2000 he was named Writer Emeritus by the Chihuahuan Institute of Culture and CONACULTA. He has published more than 25 books. His poetry has been translated into English, French, Italian, and Portuguese. Joshua Pollock is a translator and poet. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Vestiges, Jubilat, Chicago Review, and others. He lives in a constant struggle against the mechanisms of attrition and destruction.

José Vicente Anaya’s long, visionary poem Híkuri (Peyote) is a countercultural classic of Mexican literature. But it is not only that: it is a mapping of the borderlands of self, a meditation on the ethnopoetic and its limits, and a celebration of the chant as eco-indigenous form that challenges the colonial politics of the lettered city. While Anaya is often mentioned for his transnational involvement with alternative poetry movements (Beat poetry, Mexican Infrarealism), Híkuri (Peyote) is its own translingual poetics of luminous defiance: "I go into uncertainty certain / of ending up uncertain / INCANDESCENT." Whereas Artaud engaged Rarámuri language and culture through the unabashedly imperial eyes of the tourist poet, Anaya proposes an uneasily decolonial auto-ethnographic poetics that works both from and against the settler logic of the avant-gardes in the Americas. Joshua Pollock's translation powerfully renders the visual and sonic layers of Anaya's song with careful attention to the politics of oral/aural revolution, the gaps of meaning, the silences of a page where "the True Name is not written."

Urayoán Noel

In Híkuri (Peyote), José Vicente Anaya gives us an experience more than a poem. Or, rather, the poem is the experience. Here contemporary hallucination is rooted in ancient ritual, and Joshua Pollock's seamless translation gives the reader a map as deep as it is broad, one upon which we may find our own pathways in these terrifying times.

Margaret Randall

HÍKURI [Peyote] is a synesthetic delirium of language and sound streaming out of the collective unconscious - Pollock’s translations of Anaya’s psychedelic text form circuitous waterfalls of poetry that illuminates a Möbius strip across languages. This book is a nomadic swirl of “ESCAPE VELOCITY.” Drink some orange juice and put your phone away when you read this book. Let the languages guide “the alchemy in your pupils” towards the unexpected.

Angel Dominguez

Description

‘Híkuri (Peyote)’ is Mexican Infrarealist José Vicente Anaya’s cult-classic poem. Influenced by his participation in a series of peyote ceremonies in his native Chihuahua, Anaya charts a transformative journey inwards, towards a psychedelic convergence of inside/outside, male/female, past/present, self/other. Incorporating Rarámuri language and traversing territory associated with ecopoetics, ethnopoetics, modernism, and infrarealism, Híkuri (Peyote) presents a utopian alternative to EuroAmerican colonial modernity—a reclamation of autonomy and poetic nomadism.

An excerpt of this translation appears at:

https://www.asymptotejournal.com/poetry/jose-vicente-anaya-hikuri-peyote/

f
1942 Amsterdam Ave NY (212) 862-3680 chapterone@qodeinteractive.com
Free shipping
for orders over 50%